golf practice

Golf Fundamentals – How to develop good swing tempo

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We have all seen it, and some of us do it on a regular basis. We stand over the ball, take the club back nice and smooth, and then lunge at the ball in a blur, only to see the ball scuffed a few yards down the fairway.

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In this post we are going to discuss one of golf’s often overlooked fundamentals, swing tempo and give you a better understanding of tempo, and a drill that you can take on the course with you.

So what do we mean when we say a good swing tempo? A good swing tempo allows you time to fully complete your backswing and transition into the downswing without casting the club head at the ball. It means that your hips, shoulders and arms are all working in harmony to return the club head back to the ball. It should feel relaxed, and approximately eighty percent of your effort for a full shot. Also your swing tempo should be the same for every club in your bag you should not be thinking that your swing tempo increases with your longer clubs. However, good swing tempo does not mean slow. Many professional golfers have a quick tempo, that’s just their swing. Look at great players like Nick Price or Jose Maria Olazabal as examples. They both have great swing tempo and a faster than usual swing.  It is important for you to find the correct swing tempo for your game. One that is repeatable and brings consistent results.

Many golfers have a swing thought when they play the game. This includes a saying or phrase to help them with their tempo. One that we have used at Golf Talk is simply saying the words out loud ‘back and through’. ‘Back’ being the start of the backswing, ‘and’ being the transition, and ‘through’ the downswing. Try this out on the practice tee and see if it helps your ball striking. It may also help you out on the course saying it in your head.

If you have enjoyed this article please comment and share below. You can also email any questions you may have to info@golftalk.club

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The Golf Talk team

 

The exercise workout for golfers, keeping your health and game in good shape

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Golf is a dynamic game so you need a certain amount of fitness to play the game well. In this article we want to give you a few suggestions of what exercises you should be working on to keep you fit and help your golf game. Just as a not of caution. Please consult with your doctor or physician before attempting any new exercise program, and start any new exercise slowly.

Let’s start with the obvious. An average golf course is around six or seven miles so having strength in your legs to be able to walk this distance is essential. The easiest way to build strength in your legs is to walk. Try walking three to five miles, three times per week. This will give your legs the necessary strength to walk the course without to many problems. If you are not walking any kind of distance at the moment then remember to start off slowly and build up to these distances.

Your upper body is your swing engine. So maintaining good strength in your torso, arms and shoulders will will give you the opportunity to play at your very best. A great exercise for your upper body is rowing. This will exercise your arms, shoulders and abs. Use the rowing machine in your local gym on a low / medium intensity for two minutes slowly building up in 30 second increments until you can comfortably row for five minutes. You can then dial up the intensity to make the exercise more difficult if you want to.

If you do not have access to a local gym on a regular basis then a Dumbbell Set or Kettlebells are a great alternative to building upper body strength. Concentrate on lower weights and more repetitions. For example use a 1kg dumbbell in both hands and do twenty bicep curls with each arm. This will build up your arm strength with less potential for injury. Another great exercise to use with your weights is the squat to high lift position. Place your chosen weights in front of you and assume a squat position. Next take the weights from the squat all the way up to the high lift and hold for 3 seconds. This is an explosive exercise will build up your arms, shoulders, abs and legs.

There are many exercise regimes available to you that will help with your golf game from wights to gym work and walking. However for us at Golf Talk the most beneficial we have found is Yoga. This is an excellent combination of exercise, strength and flexibility and in our experience has helped numerous golfers maintain their golf swing throughout their lifetime. (please click the Yoga link to find out more).

Finally we know plenty of golfers who would love to embark on a new fitness regime but have issues with any kind of high impact workout. So if this is you, what can you do?. We love swimming. This is a great workout for golfers combining a low impact arms, legs and core workout with stretching of all the key muscle groups. And can be done anytime of the day, anywhere in the world. You just need to find your local pool. Why not give it a try!

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The Golf Talk team

Bored of the driving range? Try these drills to spice up your practice sessions

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If you feel that your practice sessions are becoming boring and you are looking for a way to spice up your routine then these fun practice drills may be the answer …

GolfballTo improve you pitching then why not try ‘Different club same distance’ this is a fun game that can be used as a warm up drill before your monthly medal or with a friend on the practice ground. Pick a marker around 150 yards away and hit 10 balls with your 150 yard club. Next work your way through your bag up to your longest iron or even a 5 wood. You can work your way back through your irons to your 150 yards club again. This is a great drill for sharpening your iron play and hitting greens in regulation.

Another good drill to help you chip the ball near the hole is ‘9 ball pick up’. Here you select a hole on the chipping green and take 9 balls. Chip 3 with a lob wedge, 3 with a pitching wedge, and 3 with an 8 iron. The objective is to get all 9 balls up and down with each club. When you can get all the balls up and down then select another three clubs in your bag. Considering that most mid-handicappers hit an average 3 greens in regulation a good chipping technique is essential for lower scores. This drill can have a dramatic effect on your overall score and maybe your handicap.

When you can’t get to the practice tee then why not utilise your umbrella as a chipping / pitching net. Open up your umbrella and lay it on the ground approximately 20 – 30 feet away and see how many balls you can chip into your umbrella. This is a good drill for in the back yard or on the beach. Try to beat your score on each go. When you count your scores you will take your practice more seriously and your game will improve

Finally use the putting green to keep a score of your putts as if you were playing 18 greens. Work through all the holes on the putting green from 1 to 18. Two putts are a par, one putt a birdie, etc. The objective of the game is to finish all eighteen holes under par. This game works particularly well with your buddies and can get very competitive.

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The Golf Talk team

Deliberate Practice – The quickest way to lower your golf handicap

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Practice really does make perfect. The more you practise your golf game the sharper you will become on the course. That said, going to the driving range and aimlessly hitting hundreds of ball into the abyss is definitely not the answer. So what is?
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You may have heard the term ‘Deliberate Practice’. This term was first used by psychologist K. Anders Ericsson who published research on how we can achieve mastery in any subject or skill with 10,000 hours of practice. Now we are not suggesting that you need to spend 10,000 hours on the driving range. What we are recommending is that your practise sessions going forward are deliberate.

Deliberate practice means consciously working on certain aspects of your swing to get the best results. This may be your take away, or your address or even your timing. Go to the practice ground with a goal in mind. I want to improve my ? is the question we want you to ask yourself. This will give you purpose to your deliberate practise sessions.

When you are out on the course with your buddies playing a non-competitive round of golf why not analyse your round in more detail than just the score. Keep a note of how many fairways you hit, how many greens in regulation you get and how many putts to take. this will help you structure your practise session to work on the areas that will help you improve the most.

To help even further, what we would like you to think about ahead of your next practice session is where did you drop shots on your last round of golf and why? For example, was it that you missed the fairway from the tee due to a slice? If so, then we would recommend practising a slice cure only in that session. Or it maybe that you are not hitting the green from 100 yards. Then practise this shot only with a number of different clubs to a target a 100 yards away.

By having your deliberate practice sessions tailored to improving your golf game you will get the very best out of your practise time and you may find it more enjoyable.

If you have enjoyed this article please comment and share below. You can also email any questions you may have to info@golftalk.club

Also don’t forget to subscribe to Golf Talk to ensure you never miss a post.

The Golf Talk team