golf analysis

Golf Fundamentals – How to develop good swing tempo

Posted on Updated on

We have all seen it, and some of us do it on a regular basis. We stand over the ball, take the club back nice and smooth, and then lunge at the ball in a blur, only to see the ball scuffed a few yards down the fairway.

www.golftalk.club

In this post we are going to discuss one of golf’s often overlooked fundamentals, swing tempo and give you a better understanding of tempo, and a drill that you can take on the course with you.

So what do we mean when we say a good swing tempo? A good swing tempo allows you time to fully complete your backswing and transition into the downswing without casting the club head at the ball. It means that your hips, shoulders and arms are all working in harmony to return the club head back to the ball. It should feel relaxed, and approximately eighty percent of your effort for a full shot. Also your swing tempo should be the same for every club in your bag you should not be thinking that your swing tempo increases with your longer clubs. However, good swing tempo does not mean slow. Many professional golfers have a quick tempo, that’s just their swing. Look at great players like Nick Price or Jose Maria Olazabal as examples. They both have great swing tempo and a faster than usual swing.  It is important for you to find the correct swing tempo for your game. One that is repeatable and brings consistent results.

Many golfers have a swing thought when they play the game. This includes a saying or phrase to help them with their tempo. One that we have used at Golf Talk is simply saying the words out loud ‘back and through’. ‘Back’ being the start of the backswing, ‘and’ being the transition, and ‘through’ the downswing. Try this out on the practice tee and see if it helps your ball striking. It may also help you out on the course saying it in your head.

If you have enjoyed this article please comment and share below. You can also email any questions you may have to info@golftalk.club

Also don’t forget to subscribe to Golf Talk to ensure you never miss a post.

The Golf Talk team

 

How to reduce first tee nerves

Posted on Updated on

First tee nerves affects many amateur golfers. They feel that the entire world is watching them on the tee. The heart starts pumping harder and this usually means they play a bad shot. Having a strategy to overcome this feeling can help you get your round off to a good start and set the stage for an enjoyable round of golf.

One thing we notice more often than not is the speed of the swing. Many golfers who are nervous on the tee just want it to be over with as soon as possible. This leads to a quick swing and inevitably a poor strike on the ball. One way you can over come this is to count in your head ‘ one and two’. One being your backswing, two being the transition and three your down swing. This drill coupled with some deep breaths will ensure that you do not rush your swing and have every chance of playing a good shot.Group Of Male Golfers Teeing Off On Golf Course

Also consider your pre-shot routine ( mentioned in an earlier article). This will also prepare you to hit a good shot and help combat any nerves you may have on the tee.

If you have enjoyed this article please comment and share below.

Also subscribe to Golf Talk to ensure you never miss a post.

The Golf Talk team

Deliberate Practice – The quickest way to lower your golf handicap

Posted on Updated on

Practice really does make perfect. The more you practise your golf game the sharper you will become on the course. That said, going to the driving range and aimlessly hitting hundreds of ball into the abyss is definitely not the answer. So what is?
seau rempli de balles de golf

You may have heard the term ‘Deliberate Practice’. This term was first used by psychologist K. Anders Ericsson who published research on how we can achieve mastery in any subject or skill with 10,000 hours of practice. Now we are not suggesting that you need to spend 10,000 hours on the driving range. What we are recommending is that your practise sessions going forward are deliberate.

Deliberate practice means consciously working on certain aspects of your swing to get the best results. This may be your take away, or your address or even your timing. Go to the practice ground with a goal in mind. I want to improve my ? is the question we want you to ask yourself. This will give you purpose to your deliberate practise sessions.

When you are out on the course with your buddies playing a non-competitive round of golf why not analyse your round in more detail than just the score. Keep a note of how many fairways you hit, how many greens in regulation you get and how many putts to take. this will help you structure your practise session to work on the areas that will help you improve the most.

To help even further, what we would like you to think about ahead of your next practice session is where did you drop shots on your last round of golf and why? For example, was it that you missed the fairway from the tee due to a slice? If so, then we would recommend practising a slice cure only in that session. Or it maybe that you are not hitting the green from 100 yards. Then practise this shot only with a number of different clubs to a target a 100 yards away.

By having your deliberate practice sessions tailored to improving your golf game you will get the very best out of your practise time and you may find it more enjoyable.

If you have enjoyed this article please comment and share below. You can also email any questions you may have to info@golftalk.club

Also don’t forget to subscribe to Golf Talk to ensure you never miss a post.

The Golf Talk team