amateur golfer

Low impact exercises to help you play better golf

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Golf in itself is a good form of exercise. The average golfer walks approximately 5 miles per round of golf and swing the golf club over 200 times including practice swings. Couple this with carrying your 10 kilo golf bag on your back and this is a great low impact work out.

However if we want to improve our golf game and play 18 holes without fading away towards the end we need to tone up and build stamina. Golftalk have been looking at the best forms of low impact exercise to compliment your golf game and in this article we discuss our top 5.

  1. Swimming is a great form of low impact exercise. We use almost all of our muscles when swimming especially the arms, legs and core to give us a very good low impact all over workout. Swimming will also give you a good cardio work out that will improve your stamina out on the course.
  2. Yoga is another form of low impact exercise that is popular with many athletes because it combines strength training with stretching something that is particularly important to golfers. Also Yoga can be done in the comfort of your own home. There are many smartphone apps and youtube videos describing what you need to to to get started.
  3. Cycling is a fantastic way to get the legs working and the heart pumping. Whether you are outside on the roads or in a gym on a cycling machine, both will give you a good low impact workout that will help build your strength and stamina. An added benefit of cycling is that it can be worked into your daily routine, for example cycling to work.
  4. Pilates, like Yoga is a low impact workout that many athletes use to build strength and stamina. It focuses on strengthening the core which is very beneficial for golfers of all levels. Pilates also helps to quieten the mind and focus on breathing which again is particularly helpful for golfers. Some Pilates exercises use specific equipment so a good idea is to look for local classes in your area.
  5. Walking is, as already said a great form of exercise. So lets try and do more by looking for opportunities to walk instead of take the car or public transport. Walking will also improve your balance an co-ordination as well as strengthening your bones and muscles. It is also said that walking improves your mood so may also have phycological benefits. Why not try a Fitbit (available from the GolfTalk store) or other step counting device to keep you motivated.

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Golf Course Management – How to play a par 5

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How to make the most out of Par-5s is a question we are often asked here at Golftalk.Golfer performs a golf shot from the fairway.

When we get to the Par-5 tee box many of us instantly reach for our driver with a plan of hitting the ball as far as we can. We hope that we will be able to get to the green in two and make an eagle or at worst a birdie, seldom does this happen so is this the right strategy? In this article we look at the course management of how to play a Par-5 and give you some thoughts on your own decision making.

The distance of a Par-5 is 471 yards – 690 yards for men and 401 yards – 575 yards for women and juniors. So the length of the hole and how it plays must be a key decision factor in deciding how to play a Par-5. For example if a good drive is 250 yards for you, and a well struck 3 wood in 220 yards then any hole over 470 yards is a three shot hole for you and only at the shorter Par-5 holes when the circumstances allow should you go for the green in two shots.

So which club should you play off the tee? Well again, this will be determined by how you are playing on the day and the golf hole. You will have to consider any hazards that you need to avoid, and the chances of pulling off that shot consistently well. It maybe that you are striking your driver well and are feeling confident with that club. So if using that club will enable you to hit the fairway even if you have a slight mishit then that may be a good club for you to select. On the other hand if you have consistently missed the fairway with your driver then maybe a 3 wood or longer iron maybe a better choice for you. Hitting the fairway is your number one priority off the tee. We all know that playing golf off the fairway is much easier than out of the rough.

We also need to consider how the course architect has designed the hole to be played. Sometimes they will have designed the hole so the green is fairly open, encouraging the golfer to have a go! Or the architect may have intended the hole to be played in 3 shots to the green and placed hazards strategically in the fairway and around the green. A quick glance at the course planned will soon show you how the hole should be played and what you will need to consider.

Man playing golfFor most amateurs hitting the green in regulation will give them the best chance of making a par, so this must be the your first thought. A conservative three shot strategy onto the green in most cases will outplay the two shot strategy. Think back to your last round of golf, how did you play the par-5s?

Finally, here’s something to try. When you are next on the course playing a practice round. Play two balls off the Par-5s. One where you intend to lay up and one where you will go for the green in two. Mark both score on your card and at the end of the round see where you came out best. In our experience for most amateur golfers the first option usually provides a better score.

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The Golf Talk team

 

Course Management – What to do when your golf ball is in the trees

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If you play any parkland course there is a strong possibility that you will find yourself in the trees at some stage of your round. It’s what you do next that is the most important factor in protecting your scorecard.

In this post we discuss how course management can help you make the correct decision and save valuable strokes out on the course and why the miracle shot is not always the best option.

Male Golfer On Golf Course After Swing

There is an old saying ‘never follow a bad shot with a bad decision’. Just watch the golf professionals on TV when they get out of position. Watch what they do, and how they handle this temporary set back. Now think about your game and what you typically do. If you are like most amateurs you reach for a club and try to play the shot of a lifetime. One that curls to the left and then to the right and lands on the green six feet from the hole to a rapture of applause. Unfortunately the reality is that we seldom play this shot successfully, and it often ends costing us two or three shots. In fact our own GT statistics tell us that you are far more likely to make par chipping the ball onto the fairway and back into play than you are trying to play the miracle shot.

So next time you hit a loose shot out of position and you find yourself in the trees we want you to consider FIRST playing the ball back onto the fairway. Unless your chances of getting the ball onto the green are above eighty percent then this is the shot we recommend.

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The Golf Talk team

 

What are the odds of a hole in one?

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There are approximately one hundred and fifty thousand (150,000) holes-in-one per year around the Golfer happy with his shotworld,  and all golfers at one time or another have stood on the tee and have hit a shot that is tracking right online to the flag stick. We hold our breath as the ball lands and rolls to the hole thinking this could be the one where we ace the hole. But what are the chances of making a hole-in-one? GT has been looking at the odds of this great achievement to see how we fare.

Let’s start by looking at the odds for the professional golfer. The pro’s chances of hitting a hole-in-one are around two thousand five hundred to one (2,500 – 1). So what about us mere amateurs? Well, the low handicappers odds of an ace are around five thousand to one (5,000 – 1) and the odds climb even further for the higher handicapper. We are now at twelve thousand five hundred to one (12,500 – 1). These statistics are for many of us a once in a lifetime event.

However if you are lucky enough to get a hole-in-one then the good news is that your chances of making another are increased. Statistics show that those lucky golfers who make an ace are fourteen percent (14%) more likely to make another.

Now let’s look at club selection. Did you know that 40 percent (40%) of all holes-in-one are made with either a seven, eight or nine iron. With the most popular club being the seven iron.

Finally if you are lucky enough to get an ace then be prepared to buy everyone in the clubhouse a round of drinks. This is an old golfing tradition and can be an expensive celebration. You can even buy an annual insurance to cover the cost.

We hope you have enjoyed this article. if so then please comment and share below. You can also email any questions you may have to info@golftalk.club

Also don’t forget to subscribe to Golf Talk to ensure you never miss a post.

The Golf Talk team