Golf Fitness

Low impact exercises to help you play better golf

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Golf in itself is a good form of exercise. The average golfer walks approximately 5 miles per round of golf and swing the golf club over 200 times including practice swings. Couple this with carrying your 10 kilo golf bag on your back and this is a great low impact work out.

However if we want to improve our golf game and play 18 holes without fading away towards the end we need to tone up and build stamina. Golftalk have been looking at the best forms of low impact exercise to compliment your golf game and in this article we discuss our top 5.

  1. Swimming is a great form of low impact exercise. We use almost all of our muscles when swimming especially the arms, legs and core to give us a very good low impact all over workout. Swimming will also give you a good cardio work out that will improve your stamina out on the course.
  2. Yoga is another form of low impact exercise that is popular with many athletes because it combines strength training with stretching something that is particularly important to golfers. Also Yoga can be done in the comfort of your own home. There are many smartphone apps and youtube videos describing what you need to to to get started.
  3. Cycling is a fantastic way to get the legs working and the heart pumping. Whether you are outside on the roads or in a gym on a cycling machine, both will give you a good low impact workout that will help build your strength and stamina. An added benefit of cycling is that it can be worked into your daily routine, for example cycling to work.
  4. Pilates, like Yoga is a low impact workout that many athletes use to build strength and stamina. It focuses on strengthening the core which is very beneficial for golfers of all levels. Pilates also helps to quieten the mind and focus on breathing which again is particularly helpful for golfers. Some Pilates exercises use specific equipment so a good idea is to look for local classes in your area.
  5. Walking is, as already said a great form of exercise. So lets try and do more by looking for opportunities to walk instead of take the car or public transport. Walking will also improve your balance an co-ordination as well as strengthening your bones and muscles. It is also said that walking improves your mood so may also have phycological benefits. Why not try a Fitbit (available from the GolfTalk store) or other step counting device to keep you motivated.

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How to use meditation to play better golf

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Girl golfer sitting in yoga posture on golf course.I’m sure you’ll agree, there are times when you are swinging your club you can feel you are in the ‘zone’ – the golf club is connecting with the ball and your shots are great.  However, on the other hand there are times where nothing is working right and you just want to throw your clubs into a lake.  Golf Talk have been looking into meditation and how this might help improve your game.

Golf is a sport where good concentration and focus can improve your round immensely, helping you to have less wayward shots and missed putts.  Better focus will not only mean you have less tension but also will allow you to play a more relaxing round.  Also, by having positive thoughts, you can have total focus through your pre-shot routine and swing.

So what is meditation?

Golf Talk believes meditation is mental concentration where thoughts and reflection can give clarity of the mind and improve concentration. It can be used to focus your mind and control your breathing both before and during the game. So how do you get into a meditative state.

Firstly, take three to five minutes quiet time – three to four times a week – to sit in a quiet place and clear your mind. Close your eyes and concentrate on your surroundings and yourself within them.  Whilst doing this, breathe in and out through your nose, taking longer breaths each time, which will help you relax and have positive thoughts. Once you can do this without to much trouble and are starting to feel the benefits then we can move on to taking this out on the course.

The technique of deep breathing can be used before you take a shot with the club, in fact, you can control your breathing with the practice swings so you are focused on the shot at hand before you hit the ball. Use this focused breathing and you swing the club and visualise your shot in hand. Now step into the shot in a relaxed state ready to strike the ball.

Another important factor is to have plenty of rest and sleep, this can help in many situations outside of golf too but can improve concentration within the game. The amount of sleep you need will vary from person to person however the National Sleep foundation recommends adults get between seven and nine hours sleep and school aged children get between nine and eleven hours of sleep. So if you have a big game this weekend get plenty of rest and have better focus out on the course.

We hope these tips on meditation, concentration and focus will help to ensure your mind remains clear in order for you to enjoy your next round of golf with less shots and hopefully a better handicap!

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The Golf Talk team

The exercise workout for golfers, keeping your health and game in good shape

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Golf is a dynamic game so you need a certain amount of fitness to play the game well. In this article we want to give you a few suggestions of what exercises you should be working on to keep you fit and help your golf game. Just as a not of caution. Please consult with your doctor or physician before attempting any new exercise program, and start any new exercise slowly.

Let’s start with the obvious. An average golf course is around six or seven miles so having strength in your legs to be able to walk this distance is essential. The easiest way to build strength in your legs is to walk. Try walking three to five miles, three times per week. This will give your legs the necessary strength to walk the course without to many problems. If you are not walking any kind of distance at the moment then remember to start off slowly and build up to these distances.

Your upper body is your swing engine. So maintaining good strength in your torso, arms and shoulders will will give you the opportunity to play at your very best. A great exercise for your upper body is rowing. This will exercise your arms, shoulders and abs. Use the rowing machine in your local gym on a low / medium intensity for two minutes slowly building up in 30 second increments until you can comfortably row for five minutes. You can then dial up the intensity to make the exercise more difficult if you want to.

If you do not have access to a local gym on a regular basis then a Dumbbell Set or Kettlebells are a great alternative to building upper body strength. Concentrate on lower weights and more repetitions. For example use a 1kg dumbbell in both hands and do twenty bicep curls with each arm. This will build up your arm strength with less potential for injury. Another great exercise to use with your weights is the squat to high lift position. Place your chosen weights in front of you and assume a squat position. Next take the weights from the squat all the way up to the high lift and hold for 3 seconds. This is an explosive exercise will build up your arms, shoulders, abs and legs.

There are many exercise regimes available to you that will help with your golf game from wights to gym work and walking. However for us at Golf Talk the most beneficial we have found is Yoga. This is an excellent combination of exercise, strength and flexibility and in our experience has helped numerous golfers maintain their golf swing throughout their lifetime. (please click the Yoga link to find out more).

Finally we know plenty of golfers who would love to embark on a new fitness regime but have issues with any kind of high impact workout. So if this is you, what can you do?. We love swimming. This is a great workout for golfers combining a low impact arms, legs and core workout with stretching of all the key muscle groups. And can be done anytime of the day, anywhere in the world. You just need to find your local pool. Why not give it a try!

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The Golf Talk team

Six tips to keep you fuelled out on the golf course

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We all know that playing golf can be an energetic sport. The golf swing is a dynamic movement coupled with an average walk of around five to six miles. This means that we need to keep fuelling our bodies to give us the energy required to play our best golf.

Here we give you six tips on how you can keep yourself  fuelled for your next round…

  1. Golf ist gesundTry to avoid teeing off immediately after a meal. Leave a couple of hours between your meal and tee off time. This will ensure your food is digested.
  2. Drink plenty of water before and during your round. Dehydration can lead to poor decision making. So keep consuming the fluids. This is also important on those cold days. If you start to feel thirsty then you are already dehydrated.
  3. If you need instant energy then keeping a supply of nutrition bars in your bag can help give you that boost that you may need out on the course.
  4. Eating fruit out on the course can also be a good supply of energy. We recommend eating apples, strawberries and bananas to keep your energy levels topped up.
  5. Try to avoid any additional ‘sugar highs’ during your round. Chocolate bars, although nice are definite no no out on the course.
  6. If your course has a halfway house at the turn, avoid any big meals. This can make you feel lethargic for your back nine.

Good nutrition can have a dramatic effect on your golf game, giving you more energy during your round and may help you play your best golf yet.

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The Golf Talk team